Lactation Service

Our Lactation Service is committed to supporting families who choose to breastfeed. We combine the unique skills of physicians, nurse practitioners, certified lactation consultants and lactation educators, interested in only the best for you and your baby.

Services include:

  • Prenatal consultations
  • Postpartum personal instruction (available seven days a week for hospital inpatients)
  • Assistance with special-needs babies
  • Assistance with multiple births
  • Assistance with premature babies: Supporting Premature Infant Nutrition (SPIN) Program
  • Drugs and breastfeeding information
  • Outpatient appointments

We encourage every mother to breastfeed her baby. Breastmilk provides excellent nutrition for your child, has many health benefits, and is good for the mother too. You may want to spend the time to read or learn about the basics of breastfeeding before you have your baby. Consider taking a class, do some research on the Internet, read books and talk to friends who have enjoyed breastfeeding their children.

Breastfeeding Guide and Log Book (view or print)

Our Breastfeeding Guide and Log Book provides you with pictures and explanations on how to breastfeed your baby, guidelines on infant nutrition including the latest recommendations on Vitamin D and a log book to track your feedings. This book was written by our doctors and nurses, based on their daily practice and research.

Baby-Friendly Hospital

UC San Diego Medical Center, where our patients deliver their babies, has repeatedly earned prestigious recognition as a "Baby-Friendly" birth facility. The distinction, awarded by the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative and the United Nations Children's Fund, recognizes birth facilities that actively encourage breastfeeding as the primary source of newborn nutrition. Read more about what being baby-friendly means.

Our staff is trained about breastfeeding, and helps all mothers who want to breastfeed to be successful. We encourage all mothers to hold their babies skin-to-skin right after delivery if they are stable, and allow them to nurse in that first hour when they are very alert.

It is also important that healthy babies not receive bottles, formula, or pacifiers in the beginning, so they learn how to breastfeed and help the mother to have a good milk supply. The Medical Center does not accept free formula from baby formula companies, but rather purchases it for infants who are not breastfed, have special medical conditions or need additional supplementation.

Resources