Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Translate
Translate
menu iconMenu
search iconSearch

UCSD Nurse Midwife Delivers 1,000th Baby

 

January 30, 2007  |   

A nurse midwife at the University of California San Diego (UCSD) Medical Center recently delivered her 1,000th baby.

“When I came here in 1999,” said Hope Renn, CNM, MSN, “I’d only caught 159 babies.  That means most of the 1,000 were delivered right here at UCSD.”

Renn helped Ana Torres deliver Jesus Alexis Torres at the UCSD Birth Center at the UCSD Medical Center-Hillcrest after a very short

Hope Renn, CNM, MSN, (right) with her 1000th
baby, Jesus Alexis, and his mother Ana Torres 

labor.  The baby is the first boy for the mother and her husband Jesus Torres, who also have three girls.  Torres received her prenatal care at the Comprehensive Health Center.

Midwives provide care in pregnancy, birth, and postpartum care to families.  They offer the full scope of family-centered maternity care services and specialize in caring for women and their infants who are at low-risk of complications.  The UCSD Nurse Midwifery Program emphasizes education and involvement of the patient in her own care.

Patients can choose to deliver their babies in the home-like atmosphere of the UCSD Birth Center or in the conventional delivery area of the hospital.

“I think the midwife program is a wonderful option for low risk women giving birth in San Diego,” said Linda Levy, RN, MSN, Director of Women and Infant Services.  “It gives women a great deal of control over their birthing experiences.”

Midwives at UCSD Medical Center work with physicians in the center’s Department of Reproductive Medicine, as well as specialists in the Department of Neonatology. The UCSD Nurse Midwifery Program is certified by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.  All UCSD midwives are registered nurses with the advanced degree of Certified Nurse Midwife (CNM).

Renn became a midwife in 1997 and began working at UCSD Medical Center in 1999.  She speaks Spanish and most of her patients are Spanish-speaking, she said.

“I was first exposed to midwifery while working in a Vietnamese refugee camp in the Philippines,” Renn said, “and from the first birth I witnessed, I became a birth junkie.  I can’t imagine doing anything else with my life.  I am so honored to be able to walk with women and their families on their journey through pregnancy, labor, birth, and into parenthood.”

# # #

Media Contact:  Debra Kain, 619-543-6163, ddkain@ucsd.edu



Media Contact

Related News

4/22/2015
UC San Diego Health System and Scripps Health are partnering to provide improved continuity of patient care, fellowship training and research in hospice and palliative medicine. Under a new five-year ...
4/20/2015
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and p ...
4/20/2015
A decrease in the amount of time spent eating and an increase in overnight fasting reduces glucose levels and may reduce the risk of breast cancer among women, report University of California, San Die ...
4/20/2015
The threat of falsified medications, also referred to as counterfeit, fraudulent, and substandard, can be quite real, yet the full scope and prevalence of the problem is poorly understood, say researc ...
4/17/2015
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices us ...
4/16/2015
The increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation t ...
4/16/2015
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have found genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and two significant cardi ...
4/13/2015
About one quarter of all atrial fibrillation patients at the lowest risk for stroke receive unnecessary blood thinners from cardiology specialists, according to a new study by researchers at Universit ...