Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content
Translate
Translate
menu iconMenu
search iconSearch

UCSD’s Palmer Taylor Awarded 2009 Axelrod Award in Pharmacology

 

November 17, 2008  |  

Palmer Taylor, Ph.D., associate vice chancellor for Health Sciences, and founding dean of the Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of California, San Diego, has been awarded the 2009 Julius Axelrod Award in Pharmacology by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET).  Taylor also holds the Sandra & Monroe Trout Chair in Pharmacology.

Palmer Taylor, PhD

Palmer Taylor, Ph.D.

The Julius Axelrod Award was established to honor the memory of the eminent American pharmacologist and Nobel laureate, who shaped the fields of neuroscience, drug metabolism and biochemistry and who served as a mentor for numerous eminent scientists around the world. Presented annually for significant contributions to understanding the biochemical mechanisms underlying the pharmacological actions of drugs and for contributions to mentoring other pharmacologists, the award includes a $5,000 honorarium.   

Joan Heller Brown, Ph.D., chair of UC San Diego’s department of pharmacology, who nominated Taylor for the award, said “Palmer Taylor exemplifies all that an academic pharmacologists should aspire to be –a first rate research scientist, a superb mentor, a scholarly and enthusiastic teacher, and an individual dedicated to preserving, expanding  and promoting training in the pharmacological sciences.”

Taylor will deliver the Julius Axelrod Lecture at the Experimental Biology annual meeting in New Orleans in April 2009 and organize the Julius Axelrod Symposium in the following year.  

ASPET is a 4,800 member scientific society whose members conduct basic and clinical pharmacological research in academia, industry and the government.  Members research efforts help develop new medicines and therapeutic agents to fight existing and emerging diseases.  Taylor served as ASPET President from 1995 to 1996.

Taylor's research has been directed to signaling by a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine, used by the body’s nervous system to communicate and control nerve and muscle function. His group cloned the first acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene over 20 years ago.  AChE is an enzyme involved in regulating acetylcholine levels in the nervous system.  This discovery was followed by analysis of its genomic DNA to delineate regulatory regions, the multiple splicing options and gene expression profiles in nerve and muscle. Taylor also studies the molecular recognition properties of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, a protein transducing acetylcholine signals.   Recently, his collaborative endeavors have uncovered much of what is known about the structure of neuroligin, a synaptic adhesion molecule associated with mutations found in autism. 

# # #

Media Contact: Debra Kain, 619-543-6163, ddkain@ucsd.edu



Media Contact

Related News

4/22/2015
UC San Diego Health System and Scripps Health are partnering to provide improved continuity of patient care, fellowship training and research in hospice and palliative medicine. Under a new five-year ...
4/20/2015
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Moores Cancer Center have discovered a molecular mechanism that connects breast tissue stiffness to tumor metastasis and p ...
4/20/2015
A decrease in the amount of time spent eating and an increase in overnight fasting reduces glucose levels and may reduce the risk of breast cancer among women, report University of California, San Die ...
4/20/2015
The threat of falsified medications, also referred to as counterfeit, fraudulent, and substandard, can be quite real, yet the full scope and prevalence of the problem is poorly understood, say researc ...
4/17/2015
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have created an in vitro, live-cell artificial vessel that can be used to study both the application and effects of devices us ...
4/16/2015
The increase in use of e-cigarettes has led to heated debates between opponents who question the safety of these devices and proponents who claim the battery-operated products are a useful cessation t ...
4/16/2015
An international team of scientists, led by researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, have found genetic overlap between Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and two significant cardi ...
4/13/2015
About one quarter of all atrial fibrillation patients at the lowest risk for stroke receive unnecessary blood thinners from cardiology specialists, according to a new study by researchers at Universit ...