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Triathlon Event to Benefit Moores UCSD Cancer Center

 

April 21, 2008  |  

The Spring Sprint Triathlon and Duathlon, benefiting the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, is scheduled for 7 a.m. Sunday, May 4, at South Shores Park on Mission Bay. This is the first multi-sport event of the season in San Diego, and is designed for sports enthusiasts of all levels. There are also special pre-race events for cancer patients and their loved ones on Saturday, May 3.

The Sprint Triathlon consists of a ¼-mile swim, 9-mile bike race and 3-mile run. The Super Sprint Triathlon is shorter, with a 200-meter swim, 5-mile bike race and 1.5-mile run, and is perfect for the novice triathlete. Those who don’t enjoy the water may want to compete in the Duathlon, with a 1-mile run, 9-mile bike race and 3-mile run.

Cancer patients and their loved ones will be the focus of the Saturday events, featuring a 1-mile non-competitive “Luminary Walk.” The day will kick off at 8 a.m. with an opportunity for participants to make a Luminary tribute sign ($10 donation) that will be posted along the race course. The Luminary Walk ($25 donation) will begin at 9 a.m. and is designed to recognize those who are being, or have been, treated for cancer, and to honor those who lost their battle with the disease. Then at 10 a.m. Tony Reid, M.D., Ph.D., of the Moores UCSD Cancer Center, will give a free talk on new cancer therapies in the tented exhibition area.

“The theme for this year’s event is ‘personal best’ because all patients going through cancer are doing their personal best, just like competing athletes,” said Reid.

All proceeds from the two days of events will benefit clinical research being conducted at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center.

Event details, fees and registration are all available online at www.kozenterprises.com; click on ‘Triathlons’ for race information or ‘Running’ for the Luminary Walk information. Participants may register on-site.

Founded in 1979, the Moores UCSD Cancer Center is one of just 39 centers in the United States to hold a National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center.  As such, it ranks among the top centers in the nation conducting basic, translational and clinical cancer research, providing advanced patient care and serving the community through innovative outreach and education programs. 

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Media Contact: Kimberly Edwards, 619-543-6163, kedwards@ucsd.edu


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