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Seven from UC San Diego Named Fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences

 

 

May 05, 2008 

Seven scholars from the University of California, San Diego were recently named Fellows of the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Sciences: four from the School of Medicine, and one each from economics, anthropology and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.  The American Academy of Arts & Sciences honors the country's leaders in scholarship, business, the arts and public affairs.  New members will be formally welcomed into the Academy at an Induction Ceremony in Cambridge, Massachusetts, on October 11, 2008.

The new UC San Diego fellows are Larry Goldstein, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HMMI) Investigator and director of the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program; Roger Gordon, a specialist in public finance and professor of economics at UC San Diego; Harvey J. Karten, M.D., professor of neurosciences at UC San Diego School of Medicine, who also holds faculty appointments at the UCSD Department of Psychiatry, the Scripps Research Institute, and the University of Utah; Richard D. Kolodner, Ph.D., a member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research and professor of medicine and member of the Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego School of Medicine; Thomas Levy, professor of anthropology at UC San Diego where he holds the Norma Kershaw Endowed Chair in the Archaeology of Ancient Israel and the Neighboring Lands; Samuel I. Rapaport, M.D., emeritus professor of medicine and pathology and former director of the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Laboratory at UC San Diego’s School of Medicine; and David Sandwell, professor of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. 

Founded in 1780, the Academy annually elects individuals who have made preeminent contributions to their disciplines and to society at large. The 2008 class of scholars, scientists, artists, civic, corporate and philanthropic leaders elected as fellows of the American Academy of Arts & Sciences includes 190 new Fellows and 22 new Foreign Honorary Members from 20 states and 15 countries. 

About UC San Diego’s 2008 Fellows:  

Larry Goldstein, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Cellular & Molecular Medicine at the UC San Diego School of Medicine, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HMMI) Investigator and Director of the UC San Diego Stem Cell Program.  A UC San Diego alumnus, he was a professor at Harvard University in the Department of Cellular and Developmental Biology prior to coming to UC San Diego and HHMI in 1993. Goldstein's research is focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of movement inside brain cells and how failures in the movement systems may lead to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. His awards include a Senior Scholar Award from the Ellison Medical Foundation, an American Cancer Society Faculty Research Award, and the Loeb Chair in Natural Sciences when at Harvard University.  Goldstein has had an active role in national science policy, having served on several public scientific advisory committees, in addition to serving as an expert commentator on the issue of stem cell research by print and broadcast media.

Larry Goldstein, Ph.D.

Larry Goldstein, Ph.D.


Roger Gordon, a specialist in public finance, has been a professor of economics at UC San Diego since 2001.  For more than 30 years he has investigated the effects of taxation on the behavior of firms and individuals, in the process becoming a widely recognized authority on tax policy.  A graduate of Harvard College with a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Gordon has taught at Princeton and the University of Michigan, where he was the Reuben Kempf Professor of Economics.  He has held visiting professorships at a wide variety of universities and institutions throughout the world and for the last five years has been Editor of the Journal of Economic Literature.  He is a fellow of the Econometric Society, a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and the Centre for Economic Policy Research.

Roger Gordon

Roger Gordon

Harvey J. Karten, M.D., is a professor of neurosciences at UC San Diego School of Medicine, and also holds faculty appointments at the UCSD Department of Psychiatry, the Scripps Research Institute, and the University of Utah. Karten’s research activities have led to a greater appreciation of the importance of evolutionary analyses of nonmammalian brains – both vertebrates and invertebrates – at a cellular, circuit, and molecular level.  His current research focuses on studies of the neural circuitry, biophysics, and evolution of motion detection in birds and mammals.  He also participates in the Human Brain Project with Professor E.G. Jones at the UC Davis Center for Neuroscience.  Karten serves on the Scientific Editorial Board of the Journal of Comparative Neurology.  Additional honors include the 2005 Krieg Cortical Discoverer award from the Cajal Club and Visiting Distinguished Wiersma Professor at California Institute of Technology (2003).

Harvey J. Karten

Harvey J. Karten, M.D.

Richard D. Kolodner, Ph.D., is a member of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, and professor of medicine and member of the Moores Cancer Center at UC San Diego School of Medicine.  His major contribution to cancer biology has been in defining the molecular mechanisms of DNA mismatch repair, the ability of cells to repair genetic errors that could disrupt the stability of DNA, and how inherited defects in mismatch repair are directly linked to human cancer. He has served on numerous advisory and review boards including the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Councilors and presently serves on the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Scientific Review Board.  Kolodner has received many honors and awards, including a National Institutes of Health MERIT Award; the Charles S. Mott Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation; the Mutation Research Award for Scientific Excellence; the Ernst W. Bernter Award from the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center; election to the National Academy of Sciences (USA); the Katharine Berkan Judd Award from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and the Kirk A. Landon-AACR Prize for Basic Cancer Research.

Richard Kolodner

Richard Kolodner, Ph.D.

Thomas Levy is professor of anthropology at UC San Diego where he holds the Norma Kershaw Endowed Chair in the Archaeology of Ancient Israel and the Neighboring Lands.  Levy has had a distinguished career as a field archaeologist working in Israel and Jordan, focusing primarily on the evolution of complex societies and on the role of technology in the evolution of ancient cultures.  Since joining the faculty in 1992, he has served as the chair of the Department of Anthropology, director of the Judaic Studies Program and associate director for Archaeology at UCSD’s Center of Interdisciplinary Science for Art, Architecture and Archaeology, part of Calit2.   Levy’s interests include anthropological archaeology, Biblical and Near Eastern archaeology, ethno-archaeology in India and the application of digital methods in archaeology.  In 2007, he served as the guest curator for the San Diego Museum of Man’s exhibition ‘Journey to the Copper Age’ carried out in association with the National Geographic Society.

Thomas Levy

Thomas Levy

Samuel I. Rapaport, M.D., is an emeritus professor of medicine and pathology and former director of the Hemostasis and Thrombosis Research Laboratory at UC San Diego’s School of Medicine. An internationally renowned expert known for his research on the biochemistry of blood coagulation and the mechanism of clotting in disease, Rapaport began his career at UC San Diego in 1974.  In 1984, he was named among the best 120 doctors in the United States in a survey by Good Housekeeping magazine. He has served as past president of the board of directors for the San Diego Blood Bank; as well as past president of the American Society of Hematology, the Western Association of Physicians and the Western Society for Clinical Research; and was designated Alumnus of the Year by USC in 1977.  He served on the National Heart, Lung and Blood Advisory Council of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; was a fellow of the National Heart Institute at the University of Oslo, Norway where he went a Fulbright Scholar in hematology, and was a fellow at the Sackler Institute for Advanced Studies at Tel Aviv University in Israel. 

Samuel Rapaport

Samuel I. Rapaport, M.D.

David Sandwell is a professor of geophysics in the Cecil H. and Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography.  His research focuses on mapping large topographic features beneath the ocean using data collected by remote-sensing instruments satellites orbiting the earth. In conjunction with colleagues, Sandwell developed the most detailed picture to date of the global sea floor, providing scientists with the first uniform resolution view of 70 percent of the earth and opening up new areas of research in marine geology and geophysics. 

David Sandwell

David Sandwell

In addition to research and teaching, Sandwell serves as an advisor to NASA and the National Research Council on marine geophysical initiatives. He received the 2004 George P. Woollard Award from the Geological Society of America, is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and President-Elect of the Geodesy section for 2008 through 2010. Sandwell is also a member of the International Association of Geodesy and the Society for Exploration Geophysics and has published more than 100 scientific papers.

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Media Contact: Debra Kain, 619-543-6163, ddkain@ucsd.edu

UCSD Moores Cancer Center

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