History and Building Facts

In February 2005, UC San Diego received a $10 million gift from Richard and Maria (Gaby) Sulpizio to help construct a state-of-the-art cardiovascular patient care and clinical research facility. In recognition, our facility is called the Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center.

When it opened in 2011, the center unified ambulatory, clinical, and inpatient heart and stroke care in one convenient location. It has also won recognition for its world-class design, including being named one of the nation's Most Beautiful Hospitals in 2012, and Modern Healthcare's highest design honor.

Building Facts

  • 128,000 square feet
  • 4 stories (2 with full interstitial floors)
  • Open to public in 2011
  • 54 beds 
  • Outpatient clinic with 20 exam rooms 
  • Non-invasive cardiac imaging for echocardiogams and ECGs

History

Maria (Gaby) and Richard Sulpizio
Maria (Gaby) and Richard Sulpizio

Richard Sulpizio, chairman of the Center’s Board of Directors and president and CEO of Qualcomm Enterprise Services, has personal experience with cardiovascular disease. Both his father and brother died of heart conditions. But that’s not the only reason behind the couple’s generous gift. Sulpizio says he was inspired by the vision of Dr. Anthony DeMaria, UC San Diego professor of medicine and the director of the Cardiovascular Center.
“At our first meeting, he made a compelling case for the work he and his staff are doing, and the fact that they needed a world-class facility,” Sulpizio recalled. “He explained it’s not just about technology, it’s about the people who use the technology. He talked about sharing everything under one roof, being able to attract topnotch doctors.

“My wife and I decided that if we could help to give a world-class facility to continue both the training and the clinical work with patients that is done at UC San Diego Medical Center, it would be an honor.”

As part of an academic medical system, the facility unites leaders in cardiovascular medicine, cardiothoracic surgery, pulmonary vascular medicine, vascular surgery, stroke, heart imaging and research. Through this collaborative approach, research discoveries can move quickly to the bedside, so patients benefit sooner from new methods of prevention, diagnosis and treatment.

Gaby Sulpizio, whose mother has heart disease, is an enthusiastic supporter of the project as well. “Our family knows, personally, how devastating cardiovascular diseases can be, which is why we have been so active with UCSD’s Cardiovascular Center for a number of years,” Gaby said. “Also, UCSD’s program focuses on cardiovascular issues for women, the number-one cause of death among females."

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