UCSD’s Anthony Wynshaw-Boris Named Executive Editor of Human Molecular Genetics

 

September 21, 2005  |  

Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, M.D., Ph.D., director of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine’s Center for Human Genetics and Genomics, has been named executive editor of the journal Human Molecular Genetics, which concentrates on research covering a wide range of topics in all aspects of human molecular genetics.

Wynshaw-Boris succeeds Huntington Willard, Ph.D., vice chancellor and director of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy at Duke University, who has served as the journal’s executive editor for 14 years.

In addition to his new role as the journal’s executive editor, Wynshaw-Boris will continue his duties as a UCSD professor of pediatrics and medicine, and chief of the Division of Genetics within the UCSD Department of Pediatrics. He has been a UCSD faculty member and medical researcher since 1999. Prior to that, he was head of Mouse Models Unit within the Genetic Disease Research Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health.

Wynshaw-Boris is a Del Mar, California resident.

##

News Media Contact:

Sue Pondrom, 619-543-6163, spondrom@ucsd.edu

UCSD Health Sciences Communications HealthBeat: /news/

 




Media Contact

Share This Article


Related News

5/26/2017
In a small, randomized Phase I/II clinical trial (SAT1), researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine say a 100-year-old drug called suramin, originally developed to treat Afri ...
5/22/2017
On Sunday, May 21, the Student Run Free Clinic Project at UC San Diego was recognized by the American Psychiatric Association (APA) for excellence in caring for the community. For two decades, the Stu ...
5/22/2017
Liver cirrhosis is the 12th leading cause of mortality worldwide and approximately half of those deaths are due to alcohol abuse. Yet apart from alcohol abstinence, there are no specific treatments to ...
5/21/2017
Among 12- to 17-year-olds who have never used tobacco products, nearly half were considered receptive to tobacco marketing if they were able to recall or liked at least one advertisement, report resea ...



Follow Us