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UCSD’s Anthony Wynshaw-Boris Named Executive Editor of Human Molecular Genetics

 

September 21, 2005  |  

Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, M.D., Ph.D., director of the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine’s Center for Human Genetics and Genomics, has been named executive editor of the journal Human Molecular Genetics, which concentrates on research covering a wide range of topics in all aspects of human molecular genetics.

Wynshaw-Boris succeeds Huntington Willard, Ph.D., vice chancellor and director of the Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy at Duke University, who has served as the journal’s executive editor for 14 years.

In addition to his new role as the journal’s executive editor, Wynshaw-Boris will continue his duties as a UCSD professor of pediatrics and medicine, and chief of the Division of Genetics within the UCSD Department of Pediatrics. He has been a UCSD faculty member and medical researcher since 1999. Prior to that, he was head of Mouse Models Unit within the Genetic Disease Research Branch of the National Human Genome Research Institute, one of the National Institutes of Health.

Wynshaw-Boris is a Del Mar, California resident.

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News Media Contact:

Sue Pondrom, 619-543-6163, spondrom@ucsd.edu

UCSD Health Sciences Communications HealthBeat: /news/

 




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