Melanoma Open House on May 24 At Moores UC San Diego Cancer Center

 

May 07, 2007  |  

Most people living in Southern California are familiar with skin cancer, but melanoma, its most deadly form, is not as well understood.  Prevention and diagnosis of melanoma are not clear-cut and the incidence and death rates are rising. Today melanoma affects one person in 34.

If you or someone you know has questions or concerns about melanoma, please plan to attend a free Melanoma Open House sponsored by the UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Thursday, May 24.  Melanoma experts from the Cancer Center will share the latest information on prevention, detection, and medical and surgical therapies, and will answer questions.

Guests will also have the opportunity to use the “DermaScan” skin assessment device to view sun damage to their skin, which is often invisible to the naked eye.

The event will be held in the Goldberg Auditorium at the Center, 3855 Health Sciences Dr., La Jolla. Refreshments provided. Free parking. To attend, please call 858-822-6189 with name and the number attending.

This event is made possible with support from Schering-Plough, Novartis and UC San Diego.

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Media Contact: Nancy Stringer, 619-543-6163,nstringer@ucsd.edu




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