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National Weight-Loss Study Open At Moores UCSD Cancer Center

 

April 10, 2007  |  

Nutrition experts at the Moores UCSD Cancer Center and Scripps Clinic in Del Mar are seeking obese men and women to participate in a research study for weight loss employing an investigational combination drug therapy and behavioral modification. Study participants will receive at no cost medical evaluations, individualized diet and exercise programs, weekly nutritional and lifestyle group sessions, and the investigational study drugs or placebo.

The UCSD and Scripps collaboration represents one of nine study sites in the U.S. The study drugs have been shown to be safe and effective in preliminary clinical trials and are FDA approved for other conditions but not yet for weight loss.

To be eligible for this study, an individual must be obese, a non-smoker for at least six months, between 18 and 65 years of age, non-diabetic and in overall good health.

For further information, call the clinical research coordinator at UCSD Moores Cancer Center, 858-822-2779.

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Media Contact:  Nancy Stringer,  619-543-6163, nstringer@ucsd.edu




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