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Zimbabwean Art Exhibit and Sale to Benefit HIV/AIDS Research

 

April 25, 2008  |  

The University of California, San Diego AIDS Research Institute (ARI) and the ZATA (Zimbabwe AIDS Treatment Assistance) Project will co-sponsor a Zimbabwean art exhibit and sale to raise funds for AIDS treatment in Zimbabwe, Africa and to benefit HIV/AIDS research at the UC San Diego School of Medicine.

The event will be held on Saturday, May 10 from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Mission Hills United Church of Christ at 4070 Jackdaw Street, San Diego.  Admission is $20.

The event will include sale of Zimbabwean paintings, masks and story quilts. The ARI at UC San Diego is actively involved in research studies in Zimbabwe as well as nine other countries. Faculty physicians and researchers who have collaborated on HIV/AIDS clinical trials with the University of Zimbabwe faculty will be present to meet with participants and answer questions.

To register or for more information, call 858-534-5545 or e-mail cfar@ucsd.edu

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Media Contact: Debra Kain, 619-543-6163, ddkain@ucsd.edu


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