<p>UC San Diego Health System Opens Comprehensive Liver Clinic in Nevada</p>

 

August 24, 2011  |  

Patients in Nevada seeking care for liver disease may now access the university-level expertise of UC San Diego Health System’s Center for Hepatobiliary Disease and Abdominal Transplantation (CHAT). Led by Robert Gish, MD, world-renowned hepatologist, patients may benefit by having access to a full spectrum of liver care, from diagnostics and testing to novel therapies and clinical trials not found anywhere else in the state. The clinic is located at 3033 W. Horizon Ridge Parkway, Suite 101, in the city of Henderson; patients may make appointments by calling toll free 1-855-LV LIVER (1-855-585-4837) or 1-702-331-6303.

“I am so grateful to be able to return to the Las Vegas community to practice advanced liver care and to provide local and regional tertiary care for the patients in this region,” said Gish. “Even if you have been told that your liver disease is untreatable, there is hope for you through UC San Diego Health System experts who will come here to care for you.”

Gish will be joined by Lisa Richards, NP, and Anthony Martinez, MD, in the Las Vegas-based liver practice, and treat and manage patients with liver disease, in conjunction with each patient’s local health care provider. Patients who need specialized consultative care for liver transplantation or the surgical care of liver cancer will be seamlessly referred to UC San Diego Health System in San Diego, CA.

For more than two decades, Gish has lead an extensive hepatology practice specializing in the care of liver failure, transplantation, viral hepatitis and cancer. He has served more than 22,000 patients in California and Nevada treating challenging types of liver disease in diverse populations. Gish is recognized in Southeast Asia for establishing a roadmap to improve screening, treatment for, and prevention of liver disease and Hepatitis B.

Gish is a NIH-funded researcher whose work focuses on the epidemiology of liver disease, biomarkers for liver disease and multi-targeted therapies for liver cancer, such as protein kinase inhibitors, fibroblast growth factors and iRNA technologies to prevent liver graft rejection. Novel therapies also include bio-artificial liver devices (BAL) as a bridge to transplant for patients suffering from acute liver failure.

Gish received his undergraduate training in pharmaceutical sciences at the University of Kansas in Lawrence and his medical degree from the University of Kansas in Kansas City. After graduation, he completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine and a fellowship in Gastroenterology and Hepatology at UCLA in Los Angeles. He is board certified in Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, has the advance Certificate of Added Qualification (CAQ) in Liver Transplantation, and was formerly director of liver transplant at California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) in San Francisco.  

He is a member of the American Association for the Study of the Liver, the American Gastroenterological Association, the American Society of Transplant Physicians, and the International Liver Transplant Society, among others. Gish is fluent in Spanish and Vietnamese.

# # #

Media Contact: Jackie Carr, 619-543-6163, jcarr@ucsd.edu


Related Specialties

Liver Center


Media Contact

Share This Article


Related News

2/22/2018
Using artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques, researchers at Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health and University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in ...
2/20/2018
UC San Diego Health now offers patients with epilepsy another non-pharmacological way to treat seizures. For the more than one million individuals who live with uncontrolled seizures despite taking me ...
2/13/2018
Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Shiley Eye Institute at UC San Diego Health have discovered that a chemical compound that activates ATF6, a gene associated wit ...
2/8/2018
Ever wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? In both cases the body is trying to defend its weight by regulating energy expenditure. In a pap ...



Follow Us