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Not Skipping a Beat: Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center Again Among Nation’s Best

Becker's Hospital Review Names SCVC among "100 Hospitals with Great Heart Programs"

September 18, 2014  |  

UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) has been named among "100 Hospitals with Great Heart Programs" by Becker's Hospital Review, a business and legal news publication for hospital and health system leadership. 

According to Becker’s editorial team, the hospitals chosen for this list lead the nation in cardiovascular and thoracic healthcare, have pioneered groundbreaking procedures and have received top recognition for the highest quality of patient care.

Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center

Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center is among nation's best.

“Since the doors opened in 2011, SCVC has become nationally recognized for the comprehensive and extraordinary care provided to patients. The facility combines all heart and vascular-related programs, research and technology under one roof,” said Paul Viviano, CEO, UC San Diego Health System.  “It is an honor for the cardiovascular team to be recognized for its tireless dedication to superb clinical care and delivery of life-saving therapies every day.”

Becker’s editorial team noted that the hospitals listed have been set apart for excellence in heart care and research by reputable healthcare rating resources, including U.S. News & World Report for cardiology and heart surgery, Truven Health Analytics 50 top hospitals for heart care, CareChex top 100 hospitals for cardiac care, Blue Distinction Center status for cardiac care, three-star ranking from the Society of Thoracic Surgeons and Magnet designation for nursing excellence.

“SCVC is a hub of discovery and innovation. Patients from all over the world have access to novel cardiac diagnostics, advanced clinical programs and surgical treatment options,” said Michael Madani, MD, FACS, director, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center-Surgery and professor of surgery at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

The physicians and surgeons at SCVC are worldwide leaders for the treatment of pulmonary vascular diseases. Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy (PTE) was developed at UC San Diego and removes life-threatening chronic blood clots from major blood vessels in the lungs. The SCVC is also known for its advanced therapies in interventional cardiovascular medicine, electrophysiology, heart and lung transplantation, minimally invasive and robotic cardiac procedures and investigational clinical trials.

“Our physicians and researchers are engaged in identifying new therapies and approaches to both surgical and non-surgical minimally invasive procedures to treat patients with cardiovascular disease. This recognition reflects the extensive experience and successful collaboration of the multidisciplinary team that is setting the standard of cardiovascular care nationally,” said Ehtisham Mahmud, MD, FACC, director, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center – Medicine and professor of medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine.

To view an alphabetical listing of “100 Hospitals with Great Heart Programs,” please visit: 

To learn more about SCVC, please visit:

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Media contact: Michelle Brubaker, 619-543-6163,

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Cardiovascular Medicine

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Michelle Brubaker

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